Author Archive

Do Wellness and Leadership Mix?

Written by Miki Jo Resto on . Posted in VPI Blog

As Managers, Leaders and Entrepreneurs we sometimes think about the needs of our people and employees more often than we think about our own needs.

We think about others’ capabilities to produce and ability to get along with the team. We also think about their ability to cope with their responsibilities, their ability to deal with stress, and grow. We may even think about an employee’s longevity. When we term this with an organizational “name” we call it Talent Management.

Talent Management and Health are not all that different.

When we turn these same questions back toward ourselves, the name we give it changes to Personal Health. Just for the moment, let’s put thoughts about our employees to the side. Take a moment and think about yourself as a Leader. Does your own ability to cope and grow right now make you feel stimulated, excited, and alive? Or, do you feel slightly tired and maybe you need to recharge? You might even feel really tired or nothing at all.

wellness and leadership Any of these – or whatever the feeling may be – is a reflection of not only your energy level but also your wellbeing, i.e. health. While this isn’t Earth shattering information, it can be a good reminder that the mind-body senses are feeding you information about your current state-of-being and health at any given moment.

What does it matter?

After coaching many corporate leaders and entrepreneurs over the last couple of decades, I’ve noticed that most of them (men and women) hold a belief that to be successful, to lead well, and produce much they have to give up their health. Of course, they don’t necessarily think of it in this very direct way. The idea takes the form of some of these statements I hear frequently.

“I travel a lot, so I have a hard time eating well.”

“I won’t be able to exercise much until this ________ is done.”

“I intended to start _______, once that project was over, but of course something came up right behind it.”

“I can’t think about it now, because ______.”

In other words, I’ll work on it later. This is how you lose your health, little by little, or perhaps suddenly and all at once. These types of messages tell the body and mind that You are not as important as work, employees, clients, bosses or the Board – or whatever It may be. The message your mind-body learns is that you only deserve to feel vital and energized for short periods of time, like in between work steps and career leaps. The Self, called You, learns that health is recreation and not a resource. Recreation happens when work is done. Leaders are rarely finished with work.

Understand that Health is a resource.

Health is a concept for the high level functionality of your body, brain, mental and emotional capacities. When someone is functioning highly and astutely on all of these levels, health has a second name. Vitality.  When it all comes together, it’s the experience of feeling truly alive with all of your senses and capacities. All systems are a “Go”.

Vitality is the highest human state when your whole body, brain, mental and emotional capacities are ready and willing to serve you. It’s the highest human state giving you immediate access to draw on all of your talents, capabilities, knowledge, energy, wisdom, patience, resiliency, hope – all necessary qualities – to navigate, lead and achieve.

When we’re talking about Talent Management and Personal Health, they intersect at the point where both are growing, together. Science calls that a symbiotic relationship. Organizations receive industry awards for it, called “Great Place to Work”, and employees just call it a “joy to go to work”.

A healthy business with healthy leaders has deep resources to increase powerful impact in the community, markets and the globe.

 

Read the rest of Miki Jo’s Talent Management blog on ManagingAmericans.

Miki Jo Resto, VPI’s Vice President and Senior Consultant, represents VPI Strategies on the Expert Panel for Managing Americans. ManagingAmericans.com is a management blog with more than 300,000 monthly readers. Miki Jo contributes monthly to the Human Resources Blog.

Looking for Great Talent?

Written by Miki Jo Resto on . Posted in VPI Blog

Looking for Great TalentHave you ever hired someone who seemed perfect for the job but then wasn’t? Have you every tried to hire the “best person for the job” and then they turned down the offer?

Why can it be so difficult to find really good talent sometimes? And by “really good”, I mean the right fit for the job and company culture.

The Selection Process

There are a number of elements that need to work together well (but need not be perfect) to hire great people. The high level basics are called:

  • Process
  • Recruitment
  • Selection & Assessment
  • Offer Process
  • Pre-Employment Checks
  • On-Boarding

Sometimes these steps are called by different names. The reality is they flow together and are part of one hiring process continuum. That’s why the first is Process. It’s the structure ensuring that all moving parts are increasing the opportunity to hire the right fit. Conversely, avoiding low quality process – which just means a process that’s getting in the way – will help avoid mistakes that lead to the wrong hire.

The Recruiter

Right now, let’s say your overall hiring process is sound and not getting in the way. Where, then, does hiring the right person start? This discussion begins with recruitment. Actually, it begins with the Recruiter.

A skilled Recruiter intentionally and systematically uses the recruitment and hiring process to create opportunities in these areas (think of these as areas of recruiter competency).

  • Relationship
  • Credibility
  • Competence
  • Closing

Many recruiting articles found in online blogs focus on the hiring process. Taking that to the next level, the discussion is now about skills and competencies of the Recruiter. Naturally, recruiter competence highly impacts the ability to hire the right fit for the job and the company culture.

Depending on the size of the company the person acting as the Recruiter may be an HR Generalist, the company Owner, the Hiring Manager, an external agency, or an internal Recruiter. However, even though one person is acting as the Recruiter, every person in the hiring process must be recruiting to hire great talent.

Let me say that a different way. To hire the right fit – that is great talent as defined by the hiring manager – every person that all candidates come into contact with must understand their part in the process and how to leverage their conversations to recruit.

In this way, recruiting competencies is important for everyone in a selection process to understand.

Is the Recruiter similar to a sales person? There is a selling element but it’s really more of a promotional element that educates and builds a candidate’s desire for the job. This is necessary so candidates will volunteer to go through an, often times, stringent selection process. This isn’t fun for the candidate! (Candidates are not “professional candidates”, so the whole selection and hiring process can be somewhat discomforting or painful for anyone.) Though there is an element of this, recruiting is not selling.

Read the rest of Miki Jo’s Talent Management blog on ManagingAmericans.

Miki Jo Resto, VPI’s Vice President and Senior Consultant, represents VPI Strategies on the Expert Panel for Managing Americans. ManagingAmericans.com is a management blog with more than 300,000 monthly readers. Miki Jo contributes monthly to the Human Resources Blog.

Think (and Close) Like a Headhunter ™

Written by Miki Jo Resto on . Posted in VPI Blog

From our VP Miki Jo Resto

How to Attract and Close Hard-to-Get Candidates

  • Identify and locate candidates faster, for hard-to-fill reqs
  • Be an effective Consultative Partner to hiring managers
  • Hook passive candidates – and – Close the “Tough Ones”

Chances are you’ve got recruiters in place for volume and some low-to-mid level reqs…and it’s working, somewhat. How much are you spending in agency fees, though, for difficult-to-fill positions? Does your company contract agencies or “headhunters” at exorbitant rates?

This course is for corporate recruiters who work on hard-to-fill reqs. It teaches how successful headhunters leverage time, tools, and relationships to hire hard-to-get candidates. Any experienced recruiter who completes this course will be on their way to developing master level recruiting competency. Watch the short video below, then click on Curriculum Overview for more information.

Think (and Close) Like a Headhunter ™ is part of the Recruit-to-Close program, a whole approach to training and mentoring for developing advanced recruitment skills. We teach recruiters how to Think and CLOSE like the best. Call or email us to discuss your team’s training needs and a free 30 minute pre-assessment session. Contact: MikiJo@VPIStrategies.com or Sherri@VPIStrategies.com

Think and Close Like a HeadhunterThink and Close Like a Headhunter Curriculum Overview

Call or email us to discuss your team’s training needs and a free 30 minute pre-assessment session. Contact:  MikiJo@VPIStrategies.com or Sherri@VPIStrategies.com

Why is Talent Management Important in 2014? Part 2

Written by Miki Jo Resto on . Posted in VPI Blog

Talent Management In my last blog, I captured why giving attention to talent builds sustainable profits.That article strongly suggested that creating a healthy organization is foundational to growing and becoming a stronger competitor in the global market. Over the last few years, global conditions have changed the Talent Market forever, and the need for Talent Management has also changed from a nice-to-have to a must-have. Click here to read more about it. (Why is Talent Management Important in 2014? Part 1) Or, continue on if you want to find out what you can do today to begin developing more competitive strength.

Think of Talent Management as a Health System.

An organization is a living system – a living organism – that’s greater than the sum of its parts. Much like your physical body, in order for an organization to grow and compete it must create on-going health and continuous vital energy. If it’s not healthy, it’s just surviving.

Talent Management is the system that creates the opportunity for health and vitality. The more trust, satisfaction, growth and innovation opportunities, and development available to your employees throughout the organization, then the more vital your organization can become. Working and competing becomes fun, like sports. The infighting for survival lessens in this vital work climate. Focus on learning and innovation increases.

In an organization, sustainable health is expressed through increasing numbers of employees that are solid and high performers because they’re feeling safe, motivated, trained, and rewarded. Vitality is expressed when employees trust in the workplace environment, feel free to be creative and innovative, have access to development programs, and can communicate differing opinions respectfully and directly with one another and their leaders.

A healthy system builds the long-term and prolonged productivity that creates sustainable profits.

Read the rest of Miki Jo’s Talent Management blog on ManagingAmericans.

Miki Jo Resto, VPI’s Vice President and Senior Consultant, represents VPI Strategies on the Expert Panel for Managing Americans. ManagingAmericans.com is a management blog with more than 300,000 monthly readers. Miki Jo contributes monthly to the Human Resources Blog.

Why is Talent Management Important in 2014? Part 1

Written by Miki Jo Resto on . Posted in VPI Blog

Talent Management Important 2014Global Markets Mean Talent Markets, Too

I’ve been watching the global business economy and talent markets closely. As you may have been noticing, the need for talent is starting to recover from the recent Great Recession. While not everyone may be feeling the recovery, there is enough recovery to be conspicuous.

During the recession, leaders of most industries across the world have shared an overarching experience – the severely changing business landscape that threw competitive markets into a super-hyper-speed for efficiency and innovation. It was a fight to survive on a global scale. This time, the recession wasn’t a roving economic beast over a rolling time cycle. What was different was that leaders all over the world experienced the survival shake down at nearly the same time.

Global Conditions Have Changed the Talent Market Forever

Of course, world markets have been flattening since the beginning of internet business platforms. Since Y2K, during every boom and recession cycle, we business leaders have been noticing and watching. However, this last one was different and I heard it in personal business conversations, conferences, and in the media. Leader after leader sounded something like this, “The future is here. This is what it means to have a flat world economy,” and no one sounded happy.

They were right. Business and markets were no longer waiting for the world to become “flat”. It was “here”. Yes, the world markets have gone through declining economics together, and together they will prosper again – off to the races so to speak, as one huge market. This is a drastic over simplification, but you get the point. And, I know you’ve been experiencing and learning about the differences of the global recession for a few years.

There’s another difference that you may not have heard much about. This global convergence of change has changed the Talent Market forever.

Why is Talent Management Important in 2014?

The Talent Market is everyone who works for your company, anyone else’s company, and everyone who wants a job or a new job – anywhere in the world. There is now one giant market of people. We’ve been noticing this growing reality over the last 10 to 15 years. However, there has never been a time before where this has been so evident, even more accessible, and most importantly so needed.

In the not so distant past, Talent Acquisition (Recruiting) Leaders would talk about searching for candidates around the globe, “What are the barriers to finding them? Communication? Understand their values and what they want? How would we move them and their families here?” Or, business leaders would talk about moving production to another country, “offshore”. Then, corporate lawyers would research the barriers to enter a different labor market, legal landscape, and economic environment.

Miki Jo Resto blogs on ManagingAmericans. You can find the rest of Miki Jo’s Talent Management blog on ManagingAmericans.